Tag Archives: international relations

Facing Indonesia :: World’s Largest Muslim Population

The Interpreter Fergus Hanson’s blog from the Lowy Institute for International Policy, cites the great leap upward for
Embassy Jakarta’s Facebook fans. The Interpreter’s banner photo is worth the price of admission.

President Obama’s visit to Indonesia in February 2010 was a pivotal event for the increase from 50,000 to nearly 310,000. Hanson proposes that State Department financial support played a role in outreach that drove new fans to the Embassy’s site. But it’s not clear that extra public outreach funding was forthcoming at that time, or since.

The viral nature of social media pushes audience growth exponentially. If the content grabs, Facebook connections ensue. Maybe Embassy Jakarta’s Facebook site is the place to be for Indonesian social medians. If you want to reach people you speak their language and the Embassy’s Facebook site displays Bahasa Indonesian. Would be interesting to see the metrics on where those 309,878 fans live and vote.

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Don’t forget Sana’a while Tripoli has the spotlight

* 2011 March 1 – Fox Boston – Huge progest in Yemen as embattled leader blames US
* 2011 February 24 – Guardian UK – Video: Yemenis outside a university in Sana’a demand that President Ali Abdullah Saleh steps down after 32 years of authoritarian rule
* 2011 February 23 – BBC News reports Yemen’s president orders forces to protect protesters.
* 2011 February 23 – CNNWorld Yemen president calls for new national unity government
* 2011 February 18 – Bloomberg – Largest Yemen Protests to Date Turn Violent as Security Forces Crack Down
* 2011 February 15 – AlJazeera
* 2011 January 27 – BBC Tens of Thousands Call on Yemeni President to Leave

What’s happening in Tunisia

Some may be aware of the pro democracy street activism now occuring in Tunisia. I saw a news report last night on French TV in Washington. This blog reports government oppression, citizen censorship and street violence. Social media tools give citizens a voice. Are there any colleagues in Tunisia who can comment on this ongoing movement?

Since early January, Embassy Tunis’s Facebook page has become one of the frontlines of freedom of speech in a country that is in the process of a democratic transition. Many Tunisians are now using it as their primary source of up-to-the-minute information about current events and popular sentiment.

Collaboration :: Co-LAB

The 21st c. laboratory of collaboration is the web, not a conference table.

Writer Oliver Marks explores changes in the business of government and international relations in his blog Collaboration 2.0
He covers the primary platforms of the U.S. Department of State’s Office of eDiplomacy, where I work. The collaborative products include Diplopedia which is the Department’s online encyclopedia, Communities@State where groups collaborate and share information, and the Secretary of State’s Sounding Board blog where employees submit ideas for process improvement and comment on implementing changes.

Ethical Foreign Policy. Possible?

Ethical foreign policy?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/1997/may/12/indonesia.ethicalforeignpolicy

Capital City vs Seat of Government


The Hague or Amsterdam?  Which is the capital of the Neterlands?  

Maps confirm that the Hague isn’t the capital of The Netherlands.  The Hague is where diplomatic business occurs, where embassies are maintained, and the seat of government for The Netherlands. So it is a bit of a suprise to learn that Amsterdam is the capital of the country. In Amsterdam, the source reminded me, they’re sensitive about it.

World Leaders Use Social Media

Real Leader’s Tweet  — Digital Daya  presents data that 15 percent of the world’s 163 countries are represented by political leaders or governments on Twitter.

Huffington Post presents a list of 15 world leaders who tweet —  old news from mid-March 2010.  Probably more now. 

No10 Muzzeled: 10 DowningStreet twitter updates will be restricted during the run up to the UK election.

Estonia knows about the value of online communication.  The cyberwar of April 2007 disrupted government, media and banking during days of distributed denial of service attacks. Estonia is preparing for the next cyber meltdown.

Chile’s President and Cabinet use Twitter and blogs  for direct interaction with citizens.  Manmohan Singh, Prime Minister of India may have a blog somewhere, but I didn’t find it.  Meanwhile, here is a November 23, 2009  interview with Prime Minister Singh presented by the Council on Foreign Relations and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.  

And here’s one Head of State who isn’t happy about tweets and blogs about his family life.